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  • in reply to: Advent/Christmas Party? #821
    Adam Stanislawski
    Participant

    We’re open to a fun evening.  Keep us posted!

    in reply to: If you are homeschooling this year, check this out… #778
    Adam Stanislawski
    Participant

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>I have a first grader and pk4.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>For math, we are using Math U See Alpha level.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>For Language Arts, we’re using Bookshark Lang Arts 1 with Explode the Code. We’re also using a gentle handwriting workbook (2m) from Catholic Heritage Curricula.

    For science, we’re using Behold and See 1 from Catholic Heritage Curricula, outdoor nature studies from SCM, and my wife, Rita, who was a bio major 🙂

    For history/social studies/geography, we’re using The Story of the World vol. 1 and a globe.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>For religion, we read a bible story to begin the day. We copy a bible verse once/week and memorize it over the week. We read a saint story once/week, use the kids St. Joseph Baltimore catechism for one lesson, and are using The Rosary in Art for Children to pray a decade each week.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>As for enrichments, we’re memorizing a poem from Robert Louis Stevenson each week or two and having a “recital” on Fridays (they love this!). We’re reading various literature. We’re doing a weekly composer study in Beethoven from Simply Charlotte Mason, and we’re doing art picture studies from Catholic Heritage Curricula to start each day (these take 5 minutes, get them focused, and they love it!). I’ve a PE background, so I’m not worried about that.</p>
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>It’s been pretty great!</p>

    in reply to: If you are homeschooling this year, check this out… #768
    Adam Stanislawski
    Participant

    Thanks for the tips. We’ve gotten into a good routine and the girls love checking off there daily schedule. They earn a sticker for each day on their monthly calendar and that seems to give them a lot of satisfaction too. We’ve had to adjust some curriculum elements, and overall things have been smooth. The flexibility and laid back nature of homeschooling seems to let them blossom naturally. It’s beautiful!  I hope it’s going well for you too!

    in reply to: Books #767
    Adam Stanislawski
    Participant

    Check out the Read Aloud Revival podcast. Rita loves that and it is full of great recommendations.

    Also, there’s a booklet called A Mother’s List of Books by Theresa Fagan. That’s a great resource.

    Have fun!

    in reply to: If you are homeschooling this year, check this out… #732
    Adam Stanislawski
    Participant

    First, thank you for adding “dads who are homeschooling”!  We just switched our children last week from attending a Catholic school this year to homeschooling, and I’m the Daddy teacher.  ALL of the podcasts and websites that I’ve found consistently mention “homeschooling moms”, which is understandable, though I’m sure that there’s at least one more Dad in the US who is homeschooling, right?

    Overall, this is a major change for our family and we’re a bit stressed.  That said, we’re only schooling for PK and first grade, and we already purchased curriculum for Math and Language Arts for our first grader as well as Charlotte Mason or Classical style enrichment activities for Social Studies, Music appreciation, and Art appreciation, and some kids desks.  We’re hopeful that this experience will go well; though I am certainly plagued by second guessing and am having trouble maintaining my peace and faith.  Can anyone give any pointers for engaging a young, strong-willed and very social little girl who is your daughter in a way where she’ll still enjoy learning?  Outside of curriculum, I’m most concerned about giving her the pride and ownership that she felt when she attended her school.

     

    in reply to: Session #1 questions #639
    Adam Stanislawski
    Participant

    Rita and I really enjoyed the videos and felt like you were talking directly to us. Thanks! They definitely felt personalized.

    When we got to question #5, we talked a lot about the “how to” of guarding, protecting, and communicating love. This reminded me of two quotes from past spiritual reading that gave us some ideas:

    1. By St. Charbel Makhlouf, “Guard your families and keep them from the schemes of the evil one through the presence of God in them. Protect and keep them through prayer and dialog, through mutual understanding and forgiveness, through honesty and faithfulness, and most importantly, through listening. Listen to one another with your ears, eyes, hearts, mouths and the palms of your hands, and keep the roaring of the noise of the world away from your homes because it is like raging storms and violent waves; once it enters the home, it will sweep away everything and disperse everyone. Preserve the warmth of the family, because the warmth of the whole world cannot make up for it.”
    2. By St. Josemaría Escrivá, “Listen to your children. Give them your time, even the time that you have reserved for yourselves. Show them your confidence; believe whatever they tell you, even if sometimes they try to deceive you. Don’t be afraid when they rebel, because, at their age, you yourselves were more or less rebellious. Go to meet them half-way and pray for them. If you act in this Christian manner, they will come to you with simplicity, instead of trying to satisfy their legitimate curiosity by talking to some vulgar friend. Your confidence, your friendly dealings with your children, will receive an answer in their sincerity in dealing with you. Then, even if there are quarrels and lacks of understanding, they will never amount to much; and this is what peace in the family and a truly Christian life mean.”

    Reflecting on these spurred us to choose two virtues of the week to work on as a family:  gentleness and self-control. So, thank you Mike and Alicia for sparking this conversation to help us get over the hump and be more intentional in our family!  We introduced them to the kids this morning, and I think they’re on board, so far… We’ll let you know how it goes!

    in reply to: Do you have a role model? #633
    Adam Stanislawski
    Participant

    When I was young, I would have answered this question with Hulk Hogan, Bill Cosby, and Patch Adams. With his mantra of “eat your vitamins and say your prayers”, Hulk Hogan inspired me to want to build a strong body, and what young kid wouldn’t want to be the behemoth of Hulk Hogan! Ignoring what we now know about the sins of his personal life, the character of Bill Cosby introduced me to finding the laughter in life, even at difficult moments, and to cultivating an attitude of levity and lightheartedness, which has stayed with me in my relationships. Patch Adams, both the man whom I had a chance to meet in college and the character portrayed by Robin Williams, built on this by his example of using laughter to help treat his patients. His method, more than the other two, has stayed with me, first in how I teach my students with disabilities, and also in how I use playfulness in my relationships with my children and even my wife! All of these men are far from perfect, but this was the goodness in them that left a mark on me as a child. And as a product of a K-8 Catholic school where I had NO male teachers, where else would I look?

    As an adult, I’ve developed a greater appreciation and affection for my father that I did not have as a child. My father was always present, even if he watched TV too often or drank too much at times. It’s through these faults, though, that I decided to shut the screen off and use moderation in all things. God’s grace is sufficient even through our weaknesses! More positively, my father is a carpenter and would always take me on jobs with him to help teach me his trade. He would also always give in to our petitions to play catch when we were young, and he set an example of saying the Rosary or Chaplet of Divine Mercy that has been an image which I often recall. As I write this, I’m also remembering his dutifulness and tenderness in caring for his dying mother when we visited her in the hospital or nursing home. All of these things I did not “see” when I was young, but as I’ve grown older, I have recalled them and come to appreciate that in him, I have an example of presence, resourcefulness, craftiness, prayer, tenderness, and duty.

    My best friend’s Dad, Louis, has also been a man who I admire for his generosity, hospitality, amiability, and ability to show interest in others through his selfless conversations. He’s the kind of man that enjoys trying to strike up a conversation with someone in the elevator! Having known him for over 20 years, these traits have helped to shape me. More important than these though, are his devotion to his wife and their united prayer life. In both he and his wife I have seen a strong example of a marital love that submits to one another and unites in prayer.

    I can’t end this without mentioning another Louis, St. Louis Martin, who, though I never knew physically, have come to know spiritually. He is one who has truly encouraged me toward a greater spirit of gentleness with my children, courage in suffering, hope in prayer, and purity in heart. The book The Father of the Little Flower: Louis Martin by Celine Martin has been a gift for my fatherhood. I hope my own daughters will remember me as fondly as St. Louis Martin’s write of him!

    So, for me, there was no “one person” who shaped me. I guess God gave me many men, only some that I knew, and all with their faults, that have left a mark of grace upon me and have inspired me to be like the Man of men.

    in reply to: Hello from the Stanislawskis! #447
    Adam Stanislawski
    Participant

    Thanks, Leandro! I saw that you are from Jersey. I was born in Point Pleasant Beach! My parents moved to Virginia when I was young, but we have many family members up in Brick, Colonia, and Point Pleasant.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)